Department of 
Mathematics

Current Course Descriptions


Honors Calculus : Students who are interested in math or science might also want to consider a more challenging Honors version of Calculus II and III, Math 116 and Math 260 (the analogues of math 114 and math 240, respectively). These courses will cover essentially the same material as 114 and 240, but more in depth and involve discussion of the underlying theory as well as computations.

L/R 103. Introduction to Calculus. (C) Staff.

Introduction to concepts and methods of calculus for students with little or no previous calculus experience.  Polynomial and elementary transcendental functions and their applications, limits, derivatives, extremum problems, curve-sketching, approximations; integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

L/R 104. Calculus, Part I. (C) Staff.

Brief review of High School calculus, applications of integrals, transcendental functions, methods of integration, integration applications, sequences, infinite series, Taylor's theorem.  Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.

L/R 110. Calculus for Wharton Students. (C) Staff.

Review of exponents, logs, graphing, limits, differential and integral calculus; integration techniques; Taylor polynomials and series; differential equations; elements of multivariable calculus and optimization. Emphasis on modeling, number sense, verbal skills and applications.

L/R 114. Calculus, Part II. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 104.

Functions of several variables, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and applications, double and triple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, vectors, Vector calculus: functions of several variables, vector fields, line and surface integrals, Green's, Stokes' aand divergence theorems.  Applications to physical sciences.  Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.

L/R 115. Calculus, Part II with Probability and Matrices. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 104.

Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, differential equations; introduction to linear algebra and matrices with applications to linear programming and Markov processes.  Elements of probability and statistics.  Applications to social and biological sciences. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.

L/R 116. Honors Calculus. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 104.

This is an Honors level version of Math 114 which explores the mathematics more deeply.

L/L 122-123. Community Math Teaching Project. (M) Staff.

This course allows Penn students to teach a series of hands-on activities to students in math classes at University City High School.  The semester starts with an introduction to successful approaches for teaching math in urban high schools.  The rest of the semester will be devoted to a series of weekly hands-on activities designed to teach fundamental aspects of geometry.  The first class meeting of each week, Penn faculty teach Penn students the relevant mathematical background and techniques for a hands-on activity. During the second session of each week, Penn students will teach the hands-on activity to a small group of UCHS students.  The Penn students will also have an opportunity to develop their own activity and to implement it with the UCHS students.

L/R 170. Ideas in Mathematics. (C) Natural Science & Mathematics Sector. Class of 2010 and beyond. Staff. May also be counted toward the General Requirement in Natural Science & Mathematics.

Topics from among the following: logic, sets, calculus, probability, history and philosophy of mathematics, game theory, geometry, and their relevance to contemporary science and society.

180. (PPE 180) Analytical Methods in Economics, Law, and Medicine. (M) Staff.

Elementary applications of decision analysis, game theory, probability and statistics to issues in accounting, contracting, finance, law, and medicine, amongst others.

L/L 202. Proving Things: Analysis. (C) Staff. Corequisite(s): Math 104, 114 or 240.

This course focuses on the creative side of mathematics, with an emphasis on discovery, reasoning, proofs and effective communication, while at the same time studying real and complex numbers, sequences, series, continuity, differentiability and integrability.  Small class sizes permit an informal, discussion-type atmosphere, and often the entire class works together on a given problem.  Homework is intended to be thought-provoking, rather than skill-sharpening.

L/L 203. Proving things: Algebra. (C) Staff. Corequisite(s): Math 104, 114 or 240.

This course focuses on the creative side of mathematics, with an emphasis on discovery, reasoning, proofs and effective communication, while at the same time studying arithmetic, algebra, linear algebra, groups, rings and fields. Small class sizes permit an informal, discussion-type atmosphere, and often the entire class works together on a given problem.  Homework is intended to be thought-provoking, rather than skill-sharpening.

210. Mathematics in the Media. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 114, Math 115 or equivalent.

This course counts as a regular elective for both the Mathematics Major and Minor.

L/R 240. Calculus, Part III. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Calculus II.

Linear algebra: vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.  Series solutions of ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms and systems of ordinary differential equations.  Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software.

L/R 241. Calculus, Part IV. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240.

Sturm-Liouville problems, orthogonal functions, Fourier series, and partial differential equations including solutions of the wave, heat and Laplace equations, Fourier transforms.  Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software.

L/R 260. Honors Calculus, Part II. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Calculus II.

This is an honors version of Math 240 which explores the same topics but with greater mathematical rigor.

299. Undergraduate Research in Mathematics Haglund. Prequisite(s): Math 240 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Math 241 would be helpful.

This course is meant to provide students with some of the background skills needed to successfully engage in mathematical and/or scientific research, acquaints students with some of the famous problems which mathematicians work on, and also provide students with the experience of working on a research project of their choice involving mathematics.

312. Linear Algebra. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240. Students who have already received credit for either Math 370, 371, 502 or 503 cannot receive further credit for Math 312 or Math 313/513.  Students can receive credit for at most one of Math 312 and Math 313/513.

Linear transformations, Gauss Jordan elimination, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, theory and applications.  Mathematics majors are advised that MATH 312 cannot be taken to satisfy the major requirements.

313. Computational Linear Algebra. Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 114 or 115, and some programming experience. Students who have already received credit for either Math 370, 371, 502 or 503 cannot receive further credit for Math 312 or Math 313/513.  Students can receive credit for at most one of Math 312 and Math 313/513.

Many important problems in a wide range of disciplines within computer science and throughout science are solved using techniques from linear algebra.  This course will introduce students to some of the most widely used algorithms and illustrate how they are actually used.

        Some specific topics: the solution of systems of linear equations by Gaussian elimination, dimension of a linear space, inner product, cross product, change of basis, affine and rigid motions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of both symmetric and non-symmetric matrices, quadratic polynomials, and least squares optimization.

        Applications will include the use of matrix computations to computer graphics, use of the discrete Fourier transform and related techniques in digital signal processing, the analysis of systems of linear differential equations, and singular value decompositions with application to a principal component analysis.

        The ideas and tools provided by this course will be useful to students who intend to tackle higher level courses in digital signal processing, computer vision, robotics, and computer graphics.

314. Advanced Linear Algebra. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240. Math 314/514 covers Linear Algebra at the advanced level with a theoretical approach. Students can receive credit for at most one of Math 312 or Math 314.

Topics will include: Vector spaces, Basis and dimension, quotients; Linear maps and matrices; Determinants, Dual spaces and maps; Invariant subspaces, Cononical forms; Scalar products: Euclidean, unitary and symplectic spaces; Orthogonal and Unitary operators; Tensor products and polylinear maps; Symmetric and skew-symmetric tensors and exterior algebra.   MATH 314 satisfies the Mathematics major requirements.

320. Computer Methods in Mathematical Science I. (A) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240 or concurrent and ability to program a computer, or permission of instructor.

Students will use symbolic manipulation software and write programs to solve problems in numerical quadrature, equation-solving, linear algebra and differential equations.  Theoretical and computational aspects of the methods will be discussed along with error analysis and a critical comparison of methods.

321. Computer Methods in Mathematical Sciences II. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 320.

Continuation of MATH 320.

340. (LGIC210) Discrete Mathematics I. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 114 or Math 115 or permission of the instructor.

Topics will be drawn from some subjects in combinatorial analysis with applications to many other branches of math and science: graphs and networks, generating functions, permutations, posets, asymptotics.

341. (LGIC220) Discrete Mathematics II. Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 340/Logic 210 or permission of the instructor.

Topics will be drawn from some subjects useful in the analysis of information and computation: logic, set theory, theory of computation, number theory, probability, and basic cryptography.
See also:Math 341 web page (Spring 2007). Spring 2009 web page

350. Number Theory. (M) Staff.

Congruences, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, nonlinear congruences, and quadratic residues.

L/L 360. Advanced Calculus. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240.

Syllabus for MATH 360-361: a study of the foundations of the differential and integral calculus, including the real numbers and elementary topology, continuous and differentiable functions, uniform convergence of series of functions, and inverse and implicit function theorems.  MATH 508-509 is a masters level version of this course.

L/L 361. Advanced Calculus. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 360.

Continuation of MATH 360.

L/L 370. Algebra. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240. Students who have already received credit for either Math 370, 371, 502 or 503 cannot receive further credit for Math 312 or Math 313/513.  Students can receive credit for at most one of Math 312 and Math 313/513.

Syllabus for MATH 370-371: an introduction to the basic concepts of modern algebra.  Linear algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices, groups, rings and fields.  MATH 502-503 is a masters level version of this course.

L/L 371. Algebra. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 370. Students who have already received credit for either Math 370, 371, 502 or 503 cannot receive further credit for Math 312 or Math 313/513.  Students can receive credit for at most one of Math 312 and Math 313/513.

Continuation of MATH 370.

410. Complex Analysis. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240 or permission of instructor.

Complex numbers, DeMoivre's theorem, complex valued functions of a complex variable, the derivative, analytic functions, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem, residues, computation of definite integrals by residues, and elementary conformal mapping.

420. Ordinary Differential Equations. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240 or permission of instructor.

After a rapid review of the basic techniques for solving equations, the course will discuss one or more of the following topics: stability of linear and nonlinear systems, boundary value problems and orthogonal functions, numerical techniques, Laplace transform methods.

425. Partial Differential Equations. (A) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240 or permission of instructor.  Knowledge of PHYS 150-151 will be helpful.

Method of separation of variables will be applied to solve the wave, heat, and Laplace equations.  In addition, one or more of the following topics will be covered: qualitative properties of solutions of various equations (characteristics, maximum principles, uniqueness theorems), Laplace and Fourier transform methods, and approximation techniques.

430. Introduction to Probability. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240.

Random variables, events, special distributions, expectations, independence, law of large numbers, introduction to the central limit theorem, and applications.

432. Game Theory. (C) Staff.

A mathematical approach to game theory, with an emphasis on examples of actual games.  Topics will include mathematical models of games, combinatorial games, two person (zero sum and general sum) games, non-cooperating games and equilibria.

450. (MATH542) Seminar in Computational Mathematics. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. May, with permission, be repeated for credit.

A seminar devoted to the study of algorithms for solving problems in discrete mathematics.

460 (MATH 500). Geometry-Topology, Differential Geometry. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 240/241, Math 360 or 508, or with the permission of the instructor.

Point set topology: metric spaces and topological spaces, compactness, connectedness, continuity, extension theorems, separation axioms, quotient spaces, topologies on function spaces, Tychonoff theorem. Fundamental groups and covering spaces, and related topics.

465 (MATH 501). Geometry-Topology, Differential Geometry. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Math 240/241, Math 361 or 508, or with the permission of the instructor.

Review of 2- and 3-dimensional vector calculus, differential geometry of curves and surfaces, Gauss-Bonnet theorem, elementary Riemannian geometry, knot theory, degree theory of maps, transversality.

475. Statistics of Law. (M) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; no formal mathematical prerequisite, but one year of college calculus would be helpful.

Introduction to probability and statistics with illustrative material drawn from cases.  Statistical inference.  Basic concepts of information theory. This course may not be taken to satisfy the requirements of the major.

480. (MATH550) Elementary Topics in Advanced Real Analysis. (M) Staff.  Prerequisites: A year of analysis at the 300 level or above (for example, Mathematics 360-361, or 508-509); a semester of linear algebra at the 300 level or above (for example, Mathematics 370) or Permission of Instructor.

499. Supervised Study. (C) Staff. Prerequisite(s): Permission of major adviser. Hours and credit to be arranged.

Study under the direction of a faculty member. Intended for a limited number of mathematics majors.

last updated 09/12/2014